Tenbury Wells

Tenbury Wells

Running alongside the village is The River Teme. Crossing the river is the famous 16th century Tenbury Bridge, considered by many to be the gateway into the town.

Tenbury Wells is a popular destination for walking, cycling and relaxing. Even Queen Victoria was known to be a fan of Tenbury Wells, referring to the area as “my little town in the orchard”, a reference to the plentiful crops of cider-making apples in the local vicinity.

Dining options are diverse and excellent, especially for traditional British affairs such as the excellent Pembroke House and Michelin-starred Pensons.

HISTORY OF TENBURY WELLS

Tenbury Wells can trace it’s history back to the Iron age. A local interest is ‘The Tump’, the possible remains of an early Norman motte and bailey castle.

Tenbury Wells was originally called Temettebury, and was granted a Royal Charter to hold a market in 1249, under the reign of Alexander III.

Historic image of Tenbury Wells train station
 

1949 Tenbury Wells Station Photo © Ben Brooksbank (cc-by-sa/2.0)

The ‘Wells’ part of the name came from the local discovery of mineral springs in the 1840s. Victorian Britains were quickly enamored with the mineral water, and the arrival of the railway in 1864 which connected Tenbury Wells on the Kidderminster line cemented the town’s place as a popular go-to destination.

Historically, Tenbury Wells operated as a ‘rural district’, a form of local government in Britain during the 19th century. This rural district included the local villages Stoke Bliss, Eastham and Rochford.

The Tenbury Wells Pump Rooms are often described as displaying Chinese-Gothic architecture. The Pump Rooms were designed to facilitate the extraction of the mineral water. The Pump Rooms in Tenbury Wells were designed by James Cransford in 1862. The building eventually closed in 1939. After a lengthy period of decline, the Pump Rooms were restored in 1999. The spire that can be seen on the left stood directly above the well.

Tenbury Wells is home to a charming grade II* listed Church of St Mary. It is a mid 12th century church that was extended in the 14th century, partly rebuilt in the 18th century and extensively restored in 1864 by renowned English architect Henry Woodyer.

The contemporary church offers all age worship, as well as a Sunday school and children’s corner. It is part of a partnership of twelve Anglican churches called the ‘Tenbury Team’.

 

Photo © Fabian Musto (cc-by-sa/2.0) – Church of St Mary Tenbury Wells

WHERE TO EAT IN TENBURY WELLS

PEMBROKE HOUSE

PEMBROKE HOUSE

PENSONS AT THE NETHERWOOD ESTATE

BAHAR

SHAMRAJ BALTI HOUSE

SINGAPORE GARDEN

UNWINED BAR & BISTRO

TENBURY WELLS FAQS

Is Tenbury Wells worth visiting?

Yes, Tenbury Wells is well worth a visit. Expect a relaxing, laidback town full of natural beauty and historic architecture and you will not be disappointed.

What is Tenbury Wells famous for?

Tenbury Wells is most well kown for the production of holly and mistletoe, as well as the local Malvern Hills District known for the orchards and hop harvests.

Does Tenbury Wells have a train station?

Not any more, the Tenbury Wells train station closed in 1962 after 101 years in service.

How did Tenbury Wells get its name?

Originally, the dwelling was called Temettebury. The ‘Wells’ part of the name was added after the local discovery of mineral water.

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